A police robot equipped with surveillance cameras on patrol in a commercial street of Beijing. This robot, connected to the city surveillance system can scan people within a radius of 800 m (2600 feet).

A police robot equipped with surveillance cameras on patrol in a commercial street of Beijing. This robot, connected to the city surveillance system can scan people within a radius of 800 m (2600 feet).

 Screen capture of a video showing facial recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.  China’s President Xi Jinping has launched a major upgrade of the Chinese surveillance state. China has become the world’s biggest market for security and surveillance technology, with analysts estimating the country will have almost 300 million cameras installed by 2020. This same year, the country plans to have a comprehensive social credit system incorporating a vast array of behavioral data, in place,

Screen capture of a video showing facial recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.

China’s President Xi Jinping has launched a major upgrade of the Chinese surveillance state. China has become the world’s biggest market for security and surveillance technology, with analysts estimating the country will have almost 300 million cameras installed by 2020. This same year, the country plans to have a comprehensive social credit system incorporating a vast array of behavioral data, in place,

 Police standing guard by Houhai Lake in Beijing.  For security, China relies on lo-tech, as well as high tech. Chinese cities use different levels of policing : community patrols run by private citizens organized at the neighborhood level, private security firms, city police, and armed police (under the authority of the People’s Liberation Army).

Police standing guard by Houhai Lake in Beijing.

For security, China relies on lo-tech, as well as high tech. Chinese cities use different levels of policing : community patrols run by private citizens organized at the neighborhood level, private security firms, city police, and armed police (under the authority of the People’s Liberation Army).

 Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density (the color patches on the image), as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density (the color patches on the image), as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

 A plainclothes security (right) standing guard on a commercial street in the neighbourhood of the Great Hall of the People where China's Communist Party 19th congress is taking place.

A plainclothes security (right) standing guard on a commercial street in the neighbourhood of the Great Hall of the People where China's Communist Party 19th congress is taking place.

 Screen capture of CCTV footage using the face recognition system Face ++, on display at the company’s showroom.  Face++ AI software allows the users to check scanned faces against a database of researched individuals in a matter of seconds. How such a system can work when the database numbers thousands if not millions of people remains to be seen. However, the Chinese police frequently boasts about arrests of criminals with the help of CCTV cameras coupled with A.I., facial recognition systems.

Screen capture of CCTV footage using the face recognition system Face ++, on display at the company’s showroom.

Face++ AI software allows the users to check scanned faces against a database of researched individuals in a matter of seconds. How such a system can work when the database numbers thousands if not millions of people remains to be seen. However, the Chinese police frequently boasts about arrests of criminals with the help of CCTV cameras coupled with A.I., facial recognition systems.

 A Uyghur looking at a police checkpoint in the old city of Kashgar.  Xinjiang is where China’s surveillance system is the most advanced and ubiquitous. Security checkpoints are everywhere. The police regularly scans smartphones in search of “sensitive” content which includes any religious content, application allowing to bypass the Chinese internet firewall or encrypted chat application. This surveillance apparatus specifically targets the Uyghurs, the principal ethnic group of the province. Since at least 2017, Chinese police have forced Uyghurs to install the Jingwang Weishi app on their phones, allowing for remote monitoring of the phone's contents.  In 2017, security spending in Xinjiang increased by 90% to $8.52 billion, as compared to 2016.

A Uyghur looking at a police checkpoint in the old city of Kashgar.

Xinjiang is where China’s surveillance system is the most advanced and ubiquitous. Security checkpoints are everywhere. The police regularly scans smartphones in search of “sensitive” content which includes any religious content, application allowing to bypass the Chinese internet firewall or encrypted chat application. This surveillance apparatus specifically targets the Uyghurs, the principal ethnic group of the province. Since at least 2017, Chinese police have forced Uyghurs to install the Jingwang Weishi app on their phones, allowing for remote monitoring of the phone's contents.

In 2017, security spending in Xinjiang increased by 90% to $8.52 billion, as compared to 2016.

 A programmer working on a facial recognition software at the offices of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.

A programmer working on a facial recognition software at the offices of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.

 Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.  The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.

The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

 At  a trade fair for security and surveillance equipment, in Beijing, a sign says "Our country is prosperous strengthen the police science" at a booth promoting police equipments.

At a trade fair for security and surveillance equipment, in Beijing, a sign says "Our country is prosperous strengthen the police science" at a booth promoting police equipments.

 At Sensetime showroom, a video shows a system allowing facial identification via surveillance cameras set up in a mall. The system allows to track an individual path through the mall. Data analysis could help mall owners to optimize the organization of the mall to maximize revenues.

At Sensetime showroom, a video shows a system allowing facial identification via surveillance cameras set up in a mall. The system allows to track an individual path through the mall. Data analysis could help mall owners to optimize the organization of the mall to maximize revenues.

 Visitors to Tian An Men square having their ID scanned at a security check. The machines are equipped with cameras for facial recognition.

Visitors to Tian An Men square having their ID scanned at a security check. The machines are equipped with cameras for facial recognition.

 Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.  The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.

The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

 In Xiangyang, at a crossroad equipped with monitoring cameras linked to facial recognition technology, an outdoor screen displays photos of jaywalkers alongside their name and I.D. number. The idea is to embarrass offenders into compliance.

In Xiangyang, at a crossroad equipped with monitoring cameras linked to facial recognition technology, an outdoor screen displays photos of jaywalkers alongside their name and I.D. number. The idea is to embarrass offenders into compliance.

 Screen capture of a CCTV footage showing human recognition recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing. In this case the software describes a pedestrian : short hair, black t-shirt, grey short, carrying a bag.

Screen capture of a CCTV footage showing human recognition recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing. In this case the software describes a pedestrian : short hair, black t-shirt, grey short, carrying a bag.

 Volunteers from a neighbourhood security committee standing guard on a street of old Beijing. The Chinese government is using networks of civilians to help maintain order. These public security volunteers, eyes and ears of the local police, are mostly retired men and women whose main responsibility is to patrol the neighborhood and report anything suspicious. The district of Chaoyang in Beijing would have 190 000 such informant, about 1 for every 18 inhabitants.

Volunteers from a neighbourhood security committee standing guard on a street of old Beijing. The Chinese government is using networks of civilians to help maintain order. These public security volunteers, eyes and ears of the local police, are mostly retired men and women whose main responsibility is to patrol the neighborhood and report anything suspicious. The district of Chaoyang in Beijing would have 190 000 such informant, about 1 for every 18 inhabitants.

 Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

 There are few laws protecting privacy in China. Online communication is constantly monitored for sensitive content. The country’s largest internet companies, and the government itself, have gathered huge amount of data on internet users. Mails and chat application are not encrypted. Private online conversations are regularly used to indict dissidents. For now there seem to be little concern in the public for the lack of privacy.

There are few laws protecting privacy in China. Online communication is constantly monitored for sensitive content. The country’s largest internet companies, and the government itself, have gathered huge amount of data on internet users. Mails and chat application are not encrypted. Private online conversations are regularly used to indict dissidents. For now there seem to be little concern in the public for the lack of privacy.

Surv - 021.jpg
 A police robot equipped with surveillance cameras on patrol in a commercial street of Beijing. This robot, connected to the city surveillance system can scan people within a radius of 800 m (2600 feet).
 Screen capture of a video showing facial recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.  China’s President Xi Jinping has launched a major upgrade of the Chinese surveillance state. China has become the world’s biggest market for security and surveillance technology, with analysts estimating the country will have almost 300 million cameras installed by 2020. This same year, the country plans to have a comprehensive social credit system incorporating a vast array of behavioral data, in place,
 Police standing guard by Houhai Lake in Beijing.  For security, China relies on lo-tech, as well as high tech. Chinese cities use different levels of policing : community patrols run by private citizens organized at the neighborhood level, private security firms, city police, and armed police (under the authority of the People’s Liberation Army).
 Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density (the color patches on the image), as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.
 A plainclothes security (right) standing guard on a commercial street in the neighbourhood of the Great Hall of the People where China's Communist Party 19th congress is taking place.
 Screen capture of CCTV footage using the face recognition system Face ++, on display at the company’s showroom.  Face++ AI software allows the users to check scanned faces against a database of researched individuals in a matter of seconds. How such a system can work when the database numbers thousands if not millions of people remains to be seen. However, the Chinese police frequently boasts about arrests of criminals with the help of CCTV cameras coupled with A.I., facial recognition systems.
 A Uyghur looking at a police checkpoint in the old city of Kashgar.  Xinjiang is where China’s surveillance system is the most advanced and ubiquitous. Security checkpoints are everywhere. The police regularly scans smartphones in search of “sensitive” content which includes any religious content, application allowing to bypass the Chinese internet firewall or encrypted chat application. This surveillance apparatus specifically targets the Uyghurs, the principal ethnic group of the province. Since at least 2017, Chinese police have forced Uyghurs to install the Jingwang Weishi app on their phones, allowing for remote monitoring of the phone's contents.  In 2017, security spending in Xinjiang increased by 90% to $8.52 billion, as compared to 2016.
 A programmer working on a facial recognition software at the offices of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.
 Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.  The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.
 At  a trade fair for security and surveillance equipment, in Beijing, a sign says "Our country is prosperous strengthen the police science" at a booth promoting police equipments.
 At Sensetime showroom, a video shows a system allowing facial identification via surveillance cameras set up in a mall. The system allows to track an individual path through the mall. Data analysis could help mall owners to optimize the organization of the mall to maximize revenues.
 Visitors to Tian An Men square having their ID scanned at a security check. The machines are equipped with cameras for facial recognition.
 Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.  The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.
 In Xiangyang, at a crossroad equipped with monitoring cameras linked to facial recognition technology, an outdoor screen displays photos of jaywalkers alongside their name and I.D. number. The idea is to embarrass offenders into compliance.
 Screen capture of a CCTV footage showing human recognition recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing. In this case the software describes a pedestrian : short hair, black t-shirt, grey short, carrying a bag.
 Volunteers from a neighbourhood security committee standing guard on a street of old Beijing. The Chinese government is using networks of civilians to help maintain order. These public security volunteers, eyes and ears of the local police, are mostly retired men and women whose main responsibility is to patrol the neighborhood and report anything suspicious. The district of Chaoyang in Beijing would have 190 000 such informant, about 1 for every 18 inhabitants.
 Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.
 There are few laws protecting privacy in China. Online communication is constantly monitored for sensitive content. The country’s largest internet companies, and the government itself, have gathered huge amount of data on internet users. Mails and chat application are not encrypted. Private online conversations are regularly used to indict dissidents. For now there seem to be little concern in the public for the lack of privacy.
Surv - 021.jpg

A police robot equipped with surveillance cameras on patrol in a commercial street of Beijing. This robot, connected to the city surveillance system can scan people within a radius of 800 m (2600 feet).

Screen capture of a video showing facial recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.

China’s President Xi Jinping has launched a major upgrade of the Chinese surveillance state. China has become the world’s biggest market for security and surveillance technology, with analysts estimating the country will have almost 300 million cameras installed by 2020. This same year, the country plans to have a comprehensive social credit system incorporating a vast array of behavioral data, in place,

Police standing guard by Houhai Lake in Beijing.

For security, China relies on lo-tech, as well as high tech. Chinese cities use different levels of policing : community patrols run by private citizens organized at the neighborhood level, private security firms, city police, and armed police (under the authority of the People’s Liberation Army).

Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density (the color patches on the image), as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

A plainclothes security (right) standing guard on a commercial street in the neighbourhood of the Great Hall of the People where China's Communist Party 19th congress is taking place.

Screen capture of CCTV footage using the face recognition system Face ++, on display at the company’s showroom.

Face++ AI software allows the users to check scanned faces against a database of researched individuals in a matter of seconds. How such a system can work when the database numbers thousands if not millions of people remains to be seen. However, the Chinese police frequently boasts about arrests of criminals with the help of CCTV cameras coupled with A.I., facial recognition systems.

A Uyghur looking at a police checkpoint in the old city of Kashgar.

Xinjiang is where China’s surveillance system is the most advanced and ubiquitous. Security checkpoints are everywhere. The police regularly scans smartphones in search of “sensitive” content which includes any religious content, application allowing to bypass the Chinese internet firewall or encrypted chat application. This surveillance apparatus specifically targets the Uyghurs, the principal ethnic group of the province. Since at least 2017, Chinese police have forced Uyghurs to install the Jingwang Weishi app on their phones, allowing for remote monitoring of the phone's contents.

In 2017, security spending in Xinjiang increased by 90% to $8.52 billion, as compared to 2016.

A programmer working on a facial recognition software at the offices of Face++ headquarters in Beijing.

Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.

The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

At a trade fair for security and surveillance equipment, in Beijing, a sign says "Our country is prosperous strengthen the police science" at a booth promoting police equipments.

At Sensetime showroom, a video shows a system allowing facial identification via surveillance cameras set up in a mall. The system allows to track an individual path through the mall. Data analysis could help mall owners to optimize the organization of the mall to maximize revenues.

Visitors to Tian An Men square having their ID scanned at a security check. The machines are equipped with cameras for facial recognition.

Screen capture of CCTV live footage using the face and vehicles recognition system Face ++.

The A.I. system coupled with the the CCTV camera, allows for basic descriptions of individuals and vehicles.

In Xiangyang, at a crossroad equipped with monitoring cameras linked to facial recognition technology, an outdoor screen displays photos of jaywalkers alongside their name and I.D. number. The idea is to embarrass offenders into compliance.

Screen capture of a CCTV footage showing human recognition recognition software in use, at the showroom of Face++ headquarters in Beijing. In this case the software describes a pedestrian : short hair, black t-shirt, grey short, carrying a bag.

Volunteers from a neighbourhood security committee standing guard on a street of old Beijing. The Chinese government is using networks of civilians to help maintain order. These public security volunteers, eyes and ears of the local police, are mostly retired men and women whose main responsibility is to patrol the neighborhood and report anything suspicious. The district of Chaoyang in Beijing would have 190 000 such informant, about 1 for every 18 inhabitants.

Screen capture of a video footage showing Sensetime crowd monitoring system. It allows to measure a crowd density as well as the identification of "abnormal" behaviours.

There are few laws protecting privacy in China. Online communication is constantly monitored for sensitive content. The country’s largest internet companies, and the government itself, have gathered huge amount of data on internet users. Mails and chat application are not encrypted. Private online conversations are regularly used to indict dissidents. For now there seem to be little concern in the public for the lack of privacy.

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