Han and Uyghur vistors to Urumqi Regional museum looking at a map of Xinjiang. The Western Chinese province is home to close to a dozen ethnic groups, however Uyghurs and Hans account each for over 40% of the total population. The share of Uyghurs in the population is in constant decline due to an influx of Han migrants.

Han and Uyghur vistors to Urumqi Regional museum looking at a map of Xinjiang. The Western Chinese province is home to close to a dozen ethnic groups, however Uyghurs and Hans account each for over 40% of the total population. The share of Uyghurs in the population is in constant decline due to an influx of Han migrants.

  A Uyghur woman standing by a pond of oil spilling from the underground in Kalamayi. This city is one of the first where oil exploitation started. 20% of China's oil production comes from Xinjiang. Natural ressources such as oil and gas make it a strategic region for China. The oil and petrochemical sector account for 60% of Xinjiang's local economy. However locals complain that the benefits from these resources goes directly to Beijing and does not benefit the region, one of the less developed region in China.

A Uyghur woman standing by a pond of oil spilling from the underground in Kalamayi. This city is one of the first where oil exploitation started. 20% of China's oil production comes from Xinjiang. Natural ressources such as oil and gas make it a strategic region for China. The oil and petrochemical sector account for 60% of Xinjiang's local economy. However locals complain that the benefits from these resources goes directly to Beijing and does not benefit the region, one of the less developed region in China.

  Han migrants getting off the train in Aksu. Over the past decades, Xinjiang has seen a strong influx of Han population, encouraged to migrate by Beijing’s “go West” campaign. Many Uyghur complain that the region fast economic growth has not benefitted them and feel discriminated against.

Han migrants getting off the train in Aksu. Over the past decades, Xinjiang has seen a strong influx of Han population, encouraged to migrate by Beijing’s “go West” campaign. Many Uyghur complain that the region fast economic growth has not benefitted them and feel discriminated against.

  A worker from the military farm (bingtuan) number 8 working in the fields, in a field. In the background stands a power plant belonging to the same bingtuan. The Bingtuans are military structures set up in the 50s by Chairman Mao to develop and colonize Xinjiang. Shihezi is Xinjiang 2nd biggest city and it economy is powered by bingtuans. Few Uyghurs work in bingtuans, an engine of Xinjiang's economic growth.

A worker from the military farm (bingtuan) number 8 working in the fields, in a field. In the background stands a power plant belonging to the same bingtuan. The Bingtuans are military structures set up in the 50s by Chairman Mao to develop and colonize Xinjiang. Shihezi is Xinjiang 2nd biggest city and it economy is powered by bingtuans. Few Uyghurs work in bingtuans, an engine of Xinjiang's economic growth.

  Workers from Sichuan setting up a high power electric line in the grassland of Northern Xinjiang. The province modernisation relies mainly on workforce imported from other Chinese provinces and provide little opportunities to the native Uighurs.

Workers from Sichuan setting up a high power electric line in the grassland of Northern Xinjiang. The province modernisation relies mainly on workforce imported from other Chinese provinces and provide little opportunities to the native Uighurs.

  Slums at the edge of Xinjiang provincial capital, Urumqi. Many Uyghurs who migrated from other parts of Xinjiang live in those slums. Government officials put the responsibility of July 20009 riots on Uyghurs coming from the South of the region. These slums have been mainly destroyed since since photo was taken, and have left room for the railway tracks of a high speed train linking Urumqi to the rest of China.

Slums at the edge of Xinjiang provincial capital, Urumqi. Many Uyghurs who migrated from other parts of Xinjiang live in those slums. Government officials put the responsibility of July 20009 riots on Uyghurs coming from the South of the region. These slums have been mainly destroyed since since photo was taken, and have left room for the railway tracks of a high speed train linking Urumqi to the rest of China.

 Donkey carts parked on a dried river bed during Kuqa weekly market. Southern Xinjiang is one of China's poorest region. Locals main source of income is farming and animals husbandry.

Donkey carts parked on a dried river bed during Kuqa weekly market. Southern Xinjiang is one of China's poorest region. Locals main source of income is farming and animals husbandry.

  A Han businessman buying cotton from a Uyghur at a market in Kashgar. In the bazaars of Xinjiang Southern crescent Han people are a rare sight.

A Han businessman buying cotton from a Uyghur at a market in Kashgar. In the bazaars of Xinjiang Southern crescent Han people are a rare sight.

  In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

  In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

  A propaganda poster commemorating President Hu Jintao visit to the city is displayed on Yarkand main square which was built over the ruins of the old city.

A propaganda poster commemorating President Hu Jintao visit to the city is displayed on Yarkand main square which was built over the ruins of the old city.

  A kid playing in the ruins of traditional houses in a Uyghur neighbourhood of Urumqi.

A kid playing in the ruins of traditional houses in a Uyghur neighbourhood of Urumqi.

  In Urumqi, passers-by reflect on the shattered window of a small store vandalized during the 2009 riots which resulted in the death of over 200 Han people. The riots have been a turning point for Xinjiang, leading to heavy handed repression by Beijing and deepening the chasm between Uyghur and Han population.

In Urumqi, passers-by reflect on the shattered window of a small store vandalized during the 2009 riots which resulted in the death of over 200 Han people. The riots have been a turning point for Xinjiang, leading to heavy handed repression by Beijing and deepening the chasm between Uyghur and Han population.

  Zhang Aiying lying on her bed next to her husband, Lu Sifeng, in their room. They have lost their son, 25 years old Lu Huakua, hacked to death by a Uyghur mob, during the July 5th riots in Urumqi. The couple originally from Henan had moved to Xinjiang a couple of years before, in search of work opportunities. They were selling fruit and vegetables in a mixed neighbourhood of Urumqi.

Zhang Aiying lying on her bed next to her husband, Lu Sifeng, in their room. They have lost their son, 25 years old Lu Huakua, hacked to death by a Uyghur mob, during the July 5th riots in Urumqi. The couple originally from Henan had moved to Xinjiang a couple of years before, in search of work opportunities. They were selling fruit and vegetables in a mixed neighbourhood of Urumqi.

  In Urumqi, two days after the July 2009 riots that left over 200 Han people dead, a group of Uyghur demonstrators, mostly women, defy the police and demanding information about husbands, brothers and sons who have been taken away. According to Human Rights Watch, in the days following the deadly riots, dozens of Uyghur men and teenagers were taken away and never heard of since.

In Urumqi, two days after the July 2009 riots that left over 200 Han people dead, a group of Uyghur demonstrators, mostly women, defy the police and demanding information about husbands, brothers and sons who have been taken away. According to Human Rights Watch, in the days following the deadly riots, dozens of Uyghur men and teenagers were taken away and never heard of since.

  A group of the People's Armed Police is marching on the streets of Urumqi 3 days after the 2009 riots which claimed the life of over 200 Han people.

A group of the People's Armed Police is marching on the streets of Urumqi 3 days after the 2009 riots which claimed the life of over 200 Han people.

  At sunset, migrant workers from Henan dancing in the grassland of Tashgurkan. The massive investments for the development of Xinjiang have resulted in a an influx of Han workers but haven't benefited enough the local minorities.

At sunset, migrant workers from Henan dancing in the grassland of Tashgurkan. The massive investments for the development of Xinjiang have resulted in a an influx of Han workers but haven't benefited enough the local minorities.

  At a night market in Kuqa, Uyghurs passing by a propaganda poster featuring People's Liberation Army.

At a night market in Kuqa, Uyghurs passing by a propaganda poster featuring People's Liberation Army.

  A veiled woman passing by a huge statue of Chairman Mao waving his hand.

A veiled woman passing by a huge statue of Chairman Mao waving his hand.

  On a street of Kashgar, two veiled women passing a wall with some writing in Uighur : "let's centrally correct the safety of society, and deal a hard blow against violence, terrorism, and criminal acts!". Xinjiang Southern crescent and the region of Kashgar is the most unstable of the whole province with many eruptions of violence resulting in numerous death. Those events are consistently labelled as terrorist acts by the authorities.

On a street of Kashgar, two veiled women passing a wall with some writing in Uighur : "let's centrally correct the safety of society, and deal a hard blow against violence, terrorism, and criminal acts!". Xinjiang Southern crescent and the region of Kashgar is the most unstable of the whole province with many eruptions of violence resulting in numerous death. Those events are consistently labelled as terrorist acts by the authorities.

  In Kashgar a veiled woman walking through a could of dust created by the demolition of traditional houses. The city, one of the oldest on the silk road and featuring a unique architecture, has been demolished and rebuilt, with many of its inhabitants forced to leave to the outskirts, creating resentments among many locals who feel their culture is under threat.

In Kashgar a veiled woman walking through a could of dust created by the demolition of traditional houses. The city, one of the oldest on the silk road and featuring a unique architecture, has been demolished and rebuilt, with many of its inhabitants forced to leave to the outskirts, creating resentments among many locals who feel their culture is under threat.

  An empty restaurant room by the Karakol Lake. The tourism industry in Xinjiang has been badly hit by the resurgence of violence since 2009. Many Chinese fear visiting the region in spite of its reputation for splendid landscape and exotic culture. In 2014 Beijing decided to award a 500RMB (80US$) incentive to each and every Chinese tourist visiting the region.

An empty restaurant room by the Karakol Lake. The tourism industry in Xinjiang has been badly hit by the resurgence of violence since 2009. Many Chinese fear visiting the region in spite of its reputation for splendid landscape and exotic culture. In 2014 Beijing decided to award a 500RMB (80US$) incentive to each and every Chinese tourist visiting the region.

  At a barber shop in Kashgar old city, on Eid's eve, a Uyghur is having a hair cut. The days before Eid are the busiest for the city barbers, as Uyghurs want to appear at their best for the festival.

At a barber shop in Kashgar old city, on Eid's eve, a Uyghur is having a hair cut. The days before Eid are the busiest for the city barbers, as Uyghurs want to appear at their best for the festival.

  At the edge of the Taklamakan desert near Hotan, Uyghurs praying next to the shrine (mazar) of Imam Asim who according to the legend victoriously fought the buddhists. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

At the edge of the Taklamakan desert near Hotan, Uyghurs praying next to the shrine (mazar) of Imam Asim who according to the legend victoriously fought the buddhists. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

  A huge crowd of Uighurs has gathered in front of Id Kah mosque in Kashgar for Eid prayers. The mosque is already full and people are be praying outside. In July 2014 the Imam of the mosque who had supported the Communist party was stabbed to death by assailants. Imam Tahir was frequently quoted by state media praising the party and condemning separatists. In 2010 he told a meeting at the annual session of the NPC: "Some hostile forces in and outside China have made use of religion to carry out penetration, sabotage and secessionist activities in Xinjiang, and they also sowed discord between religious people and non-religious people. So we must keep vigilance."

A huge crowd of Uighurs has gathered in front of Id Kah mosque in Kashgar for Eid prayers. The mosque is already full and people are be praying outside. In July 2014 the Imam of the mosque who had supported the Communist party was stabbed to death by assailants. Imam Tahir was frequently quoted by state media praising the party and condemning separatists. In 2010 he told a meeting at the annual session of the NPC: "Some hostile forces in and outside China have made use of religion to carry out penetration, sabotage and secessionist activities in Xinjiang, and they also sowed discord between religious people and non-religious people. So we must keep vigilance."

  In Kashgar, Uyghurs sitting before breaking the fast during Ramadan. Food is distributed to the needy during the holy month of Ramadan. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

In Kashgar, Uyghurs sitting before breaking the fast during Ramadan. Food is distributed to the needy during the holy month of Ramadan. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

  In Yarkand, Uyghur families have gathered to break the fast in a restaurant during the Holy month of Ramadan. A veiled waitress is carrying dishes to a table.

In Yarkand, Uyghur families have gathered to break the fast in a restaurant during the Holy month of Ramadan. A veiled waitress is carrying dishes to a table.

  Uyghurs selling prayer carpets at a Hotan market.

Uyghurs selling prayer carpets at a Hotan market.

0029 Xinjiang.jpg
  n Kashgar old city, in front of a tailor shop, female mannequins have their eyes covered by a piece of paper. Strict followers of Islam consider inappropriate for women or their representation, to show their eyes. Religious and cultural repression by Beijing has created a resurgence of a stricter form of Islam in this city of Southern Xinjiang.

n Kashgar old city, in front of a tailor shop, female mannequins have their eyes covered by a piece of paper. Strict followers of Islam consider inappropriate for women or their representation, to show their eyes. Religious and cultural repression by Beijing has created a resurgence of a stricter form of Islam in this city of Southern Xinjiang.

  At a market in Kuqa a Uyghur is checking out CDs and DVDs on sale. When it comes to music and movies, Uyghur tend to prefer local, Turkish or Indian films and singers rather than Mandarin speaking products.

At a market in Kuqa a Uyghur is checking out CDs and DVDs on sale. When it comes to music and movies, Uyghur tend to prefer local, Turkish or Indian films and singers rather than Mandarin speaking products.

  Crowds at kebab stalls in Yarkand.

Crowds at kebab stalls in Yarkand.

  A busy street of Kashgar old city a couple of days before Eid festival

A busy street of Kashgar old city a couple of days before Eid festival

 In Kuqa, a Uyghur couple posing with their child for a photo. Since 1988, Uighurs have to obey birth controle regulations. Less restrictive than the one child policy imposed on the Hans, this regulations is very unpopular among an ehnic group where families with more than 6 children was common. In cities, couples can't have more than two children and 3 in rural areas.

In Kuqa, a Uyghur couple posing with their child for a photo. Since 1988, Uighurs have to obey birth controle regulations. Less restrictive than the one child policy imposed on the Hans, this regulations is very unpopular among an ehnic group where families with more than 6 children was common. In cities, couples can't have more than two children and 3 in rural areas.

  Han and Uyghur vistors to Urumqi Regional museum looking at a map of Xinjiang. The Western Chinese province is home to close to a dozen ethnic groups, however Uyghurs and Hans account each for over 40% of the total population. The share of Uyghurs in the population is in constant decline due to an influx of Han migrants.
  A Uyghur woman standing by a pond of oil spilling from the underground in Kalamayi. This city is one of the first where oil exploitation started. 20% of China's oil production comes from Xinjiang. Natural ressources such as oil and gas make it a strategic region for China. The oil and petrochemical sector account for 60% of Xinjiang's local economy. However locals complain that the benefits from these resources goes directly to Beijing and does not benefit the region, one of the less developed region in China.
  Han migrants getting off the train in Aksu. Over the past decades, Xinjiang has seen a strong influx of Han population, encouraged to migrate by Beijing’s “go West” campaign. Many Uyghur complain that the region fast economic growth has not benefitted them and feel discriminated against.
  A worker from the military farm (bingtuan) number 8 working in the fields, in a field. In the background stands a power plant belonging to the same bingtuan. The Bingtuans are military structures set up in the 50s by Chairman Mao to develop and colonize Xinjiang. Shihezi is Xinjiang 2nd biggest city and it economy is powered by bingtuans. Few Uyghurs work in bingtuans, an engine of Xinjiang's economic growth.
  Workers from Sichuan setting up a high power electric line in the grassland of Northern Xinjiang. The province modernisation relies mainly on workforce imported from other Chinese provinces and provide little opportunities to the native Uighurs.
  Slums at the edge of Xinjiang provincial capital, Urumqi. Many Uyghurs who migrated from other parts of Xinjiang live in those slums. Government officials put the responsibility of July 20009 riots on Uyghurs coming from the South of the region. These slums have been mainly destroyed since since photo was taken, and have left room for the railway tracks of a high speed train linking Urumqi to the rest of China.
 Donkey carts parked on a dried river bed during Kuqa weekly market. Southern Xinjiang is one of China's poorest region. Locals main source of income is farming and animals husbandry.
  A Han businessman buying cotton from a Uyghur at a market in Kashgar. In the bazaars of Xinjiang Southern crescent Han people are a rare sight.
  In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.
  In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.
  A propaganda poster commemorating President Hu Jintao visit to the city is displayed on Yarkand main square which was built over the ruins of the old city.
  A kid playing in the ruins of traditional houses in a Uyghur neighbourhood of Urumqi.
  In Urumqi, passers-by reflect on the shattered window of a small store vandalized during the 2009 riots which resulted in the death of over 200 Han people. The riots have been a turning point for Xinjiang, leading to heavy handed repression by Beijing and deepening the chasm between Uyghur and Han population.
  Zhang Aiying lying on her bed next to her husband, Lu Sifeng, in their room. They have lost their son, 25 years old Lu Huakua, hacked to death by a Uyghur mob, during the July 5th riots in Urumqi. The couple originally from Henan had moved to Xinjiang a couple of years before, in search of work opportunities. They were selling fruit and vegetables in a mixed neighbourhood of Urumqi.
  In Urumqi, two days after the July 2009 riots that left over 200 Han people dead, a group of Uyghur demonstrators, mostly women, defy the police and demanding information about husbands, brothers and sons who have been taken away. According to Human Rights Watch, in the days following the deadly riots, dozens of Uyghur men and teenagers were taken away and never heard of since.
  A group of the People's Armed Police is marching on the streets of Urumqi 3 days after the 2009 riots which claimed the life of over 200 Han people.
  At sunset, migrant workers from Henan dancing in the grassland of Tashgurkan. The massive investments for the development of Xinjiang have resulted in a an influx of Han workers but haven't benefited enough the local minorities.
  At a night market in Kuqa, Uyghurs passing by a propaganda poster featuring People's Liberation Army.
  A veiled woman passing by a huge statue of Chairman Mao waving his hand.
  On a street of Kashgar, two veiled women passing a wall with some writing in Uighur : "let's centrally correct the safety of society, and deal a hard blow against violence, terrorism, and criminal acts!". Xinjiang Southern crescent and the region of Kashgar is the most unstable of the whole province with many eruptions of violence resulting in numerous death. Those events are consistently labelled as terrorist acts by the authorities.
  In Kashgar a veiled woman walking through a could of dust created by the demolition of traditional houses. The city, one of the oldest on the silk road and featuring a unique architecture, has been demolished and rebuilt, with many of its inhabitants forced to leave to the outskirts, creating resentments among many locals who feel their culture is under threat.
  An empty restaurant room by the Karakol Lake. The tourism industry in Xinjiang has been badly hit by the resurgence of violence since 2009. Many Chinese fear visiting the region in spite of its reputation for splendid landscape and exotic culture. In 2014 Beijing decided to award a 500RMB (80US$) incentive to each and every Chinese tourist visiting the region.
  At a barber shop in Kashgar old city, on Eid's eve, a Uyghur is having a hair cut. The days before Eid are the busiest for the city barbers, as Uyghurs want to appear at their best for the festival.
  At the edge of the Taklamakan desert near Hotan, Uyghurs praying next to the shrine (mazar) of Imam Asim who according to the legend victoriously fought the buddhists. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.
  A huge crowd of Uighurs has gathered in front of Id Kah mosque in Kashgar for Eid prayers. The mosque is already full and people are be praying outside. In July 2014 the Imam of the mosque who had supported the Communist party was stabbed to death by assailants. Imam Tahir was frequently quoted by state media praising the party and condemning separatists. In 2010 he told a meeting at the annual session of the NPC: "Some hostile forces in and outside China have made use of religion to carry out penetration, sabotage and secessionist activities in Xinjiang, and they also sowed discord between religious people and non-religious people. So we must keep vigilance."
  In Kashgar, Uyghurs sitting before breaking the fast during Ramadan. Food is distributed to the needy during the holy month of Ramadan. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.
  In Yarkand, Uyghur families have gathered to break the fast in a restaurant during the Holy month of Ramadan. A veiled waitress is carrying dishes to a table.
  Uyghurs selling prayer carpets at a Hotan market.
0029 Xinjiang.jpg
  n Kashgar old city, in front of a tailor shop, female mannequins have their eyes covered by a piece of paper. Strict followers of Islam consider inappropriate for women or their representation, to show their eyes. Religious and cultural repression by Beijing has created a resurgence of a stricter form of Islam in this city of Southern Xinjiang.
  At a market in Kuqa a Uyghur is checking out CDs and DVDs on sale. When it comes to music and movies, Uyghur tend to prefer local, Turkish or Indian films and singers rather than Mandarin speaking products.
  Crowds at kebab stalls in Yarkand.
  A busy street of Kashgar old city a couple of days before Eid festival
 In Kuqa, a Uyghur couple posing with their child for a photo. Since 1988, Uighurs have to obey birth controle regulations. Less restrictive than the one child policy imposed on the Hans, this regulations is very unpopular among an ehnic group where families with more than 6 children was common. In cities, couples can't have more than two children and 3 in rural areas.

Han and Uyghur vistors to Urumqi Regional museum looking at a map of Xinjiang. The Western Chinese province is home to close to a dozen ethnic groups, however Uyghurs and Hans account each for over 40% of the total population. The share of Uyghurs in the population is in constant decline due to an influx of Han migrants.

A Uyghur woman standing by a pond of oil spilling from the underground in Kalamayi. This city is one of the first where oil exploitation started. 20% of China's oil production comes from Xinjiang. Natural ressources such as oil and gas make it a strategic region for China. The oil and petrochemical sector account for 60% of Xinjiang's local economy. However locals complain that the benefits from these resources goes directly to Beijing and does not benefit the region, one of the less developed region in China.

Han migrants getting off the train in Aksu. Over the past decades, Xinjiang has seen a strong influx of Han population, encouraged to migrate by Beijing’s “go West” campaign. Many Uyghur complain that the region fast economic growth has not benefitted them and feel discriminated against.

A worker from the military farm (bingtuan) number 8 working in the fields, in a field. In the background stands a power plant belonging to the same bingtuan. The Bingtuans are military structures set up in the 50s by Chairman Mao to develop and colonize Xinjiang. Shihezi is Xinjiang 2nd biggest city and it economy is powered by bingtuans. Few Uyghurs work in bingtuans, an engine of Xinjiang's economic growth.

Workers from Sichuan setting up a high power electric line in the grassland of Northern Xinjiang. The province modernisation relies mainly on workforce imported from other Chinese provinces and provide little opportunities to the native Uighurs.

Slums at the edge of Xinjiang provincial capital, Urumqi. Many Uyghurs who migrated from other parts of Xinjiang live in those slums. Government officials put the responsibility of July 20009 riots on Uyghurs coming from the South of the region. These slums have been mainly destroyed since since photo was taken, and have left room for the railway tracks of a high speed train linking Urumqi to the rest of China.

Donkey carts parked on a dried river bed during Kuqa weekly market. Southern Xinjiang is one of China's poorest region. Locals main source of income is farming and animals husbandry.

A Han businessman buying cotton from a Uyghur at a market in Kashgar. In the bazaars of Xinjiang Southern crescent Han people are a rare sight.

In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

In Yili, a Uyghur passenger on a bus covered with an advertising campaign for a real estate project and featuring a Han business woman. In Xinjiang the economic growth has mainly benefitted the Han population, created resentment among Uyghurs.

A propaganda poster commemorating President Hu Jintao visit to the city is displayed on Yarkand main square which was built over the ruins of the old city.

A kid playing in the ruins of traditional houses in a Uyghur neighbourhood of Urumqi.

In Urumqi, passers-by reflect on the shattered window of a small store vandalized during the 2009 riots which resulted in the death of over 200 Han people. The riots have been a turning point for Xinjiang, leading to heavy handed repression by Beijing and deepening the chasm between Uyghur and Han population.

Zhang Aiying lying on her bed next to her husband, Lu Sifeng, in their room. They have lost their son, 25 years old Lu Huakua, hacked to death by a Uyghur mob, during the July 5th riots in Urumqi. The couple originally from Henan had moved to Xinjiang a couple of years before, in search of work opportunities. They were selling fruit and vegetables in a mixed neighbourhood of Urumqi.

In Urumqi, two days after the July 2009 riots that left over 200 Han people dead, a group of Uyghur demonstrators, mostly women, defy the police and demanding information about husbands, brothers and sons who have been taken away. According to Human Rights Watch, in the days following the deadly riots, dozens of Uyghur men and teenagers were taken away and never heard of since.

A group of the People's Armed Police is marching on the streets of Urumqi 3 days after the 2009 riots which claimed the life of over 200 Han people.

At sunset, migrant workers from Henan dancing in the grassland of Tashgurkan. The massive investments for the development of Xinjiang have resulted in a an influx of Han workers but haven't benefited enough the local minorities.

At a night market in Kuqa, Uyghurs passing by a propaganda poster featuring People's Liberation Army.

A veiled woman passing by a huge statue of Chairman Mao waving his hand.

On a street of Kashgar, two veiled women passing a wall with some writing in Uighur : "let's centrally correct the safety of society, and deal a hard blow against violence, terrorism, and criminal acts!". Xinjiang Southern crescent and the region of Kashgar is the most unstable of the whole province with many eruptions of violence resulting in numerous death. Those events are consistently labelled as terrorist acts by the authorities.

In Kashgar a veiled woman walking through a could of dust created by the demolition of traditional houses. The city, one of the oldest on the silk road and featuring a unique architecture, has been demolished and rebuilt, with many of its inhabitants forced to leave to the outskirts, creating resentments among many locals who feel their culture is under threat.

An empty restaurant room by the Karakol Lake. The tourism industry in Xinjiang has been badly hit by the resurgence of violence since 2009. Many Chinese fear visiting the region in spite of its reputation for splendid landscape and exotic culture. In 2014 Beijing decided to award a 500RMB (80US$) incentive to each and every Chinese tourist visiting the region.

At a barber shop in Kashgar old city, on Eid's eve, a Uyghur is having a hair cut. The days before Eid are the busiest for the city barbers, as Uyghurs want to appear at their best for the festival.

At the edge of the Taklamakan desert near Hotan, Uyghurs praying next to the shrine (mazar) of Imam Asim who according to the legend victoriously fought the buddhists. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

A huge crowd of Uighurs has gathered in front of Id Kah mosque in Kashgar for Eid prayers. The mosque is already full and people are be praying outside. In July 2014 the Imam of the mosque who had supported the Communist party was stabbed to death by assailants. Imam Tahir was frequently quoted by state media praising the party and condemning separatists. In 2010 he told a meeting at the annual session of the NPC: "Some hostile forces in and outside China have made use of religion to carry out penetration, sabotage and secessionist activities in Xinjiang, and they also sowed discord between religious people and non-religious people. So we must keep vigilance."

In Kashgar, Uyghurs sitting before breaking the fast during Ramadan. Food is distributed to the needy during the holy month of Ramadan. Uyghurs are complaining of religious repression imposed by Beijing. Among many rules : it is forbidden to pray in public (outside religious edifice). Civil servants, people under 18 years old are banned from going to the mosque and fasting during Ramadan.

In Yarkand, Uyghur families have gathered to break the fast in a restaurant during the Holy month of Ramadan. A veiled waitress is carrying dishes to a table.

Uyghurs selling prayer carpets at a Hotan market.

n Kashgar old city, in front of a tailor shop, female mannequins have their eyes covered by a piece of paper. Strict followers of Islam consider inappropriate for women or their representation, to show their eyes. Religious and cultural repression by Beijing has created a resurgence of a stricter form of Islam in this city of Southern Xinjiang.

At a market in Kuqa a Uyghur is checking out CDs and DVDs on sale. When it comes to music and movies, Uyghur tend to prefer local, Turkish or Indian films and singers rather than Mandarin speaking products.

Crowds at kebab stalls in Yarkand.

A busy street of Kashgar old city a couple of days before Eid festival

In Kuqa, a Uyghur couple posing with their child for a photo. Since 1988, Uighurs have to obey birth controle regulations. Less restrictive than the one child policy imposed on the Hans, this regulations is very unpopular among an ehnic group where families with more than 6 children was common. In cities, couples can't have more than two children and 3 in rural areas.

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